Finding Balance After a Stroke

Name: Barry Hurchalla
Location: Florida Treasure Coast
Occupation: Retired auctioneer and antique dealer

Barry Hurchalla Warrior 2My story began in 2009. I was 65, recently retired, and in good health – until I wasn’t. I was always a ‘sometimes’ runner, biker, hiker, and tennis player, but I started to notice my belly expanding. No, not a beer gut; turns out it was fluid accumulation from my liver not working the way it should. It was a genetic thing. I won the lottery: Two mutant genes triggering a protein deficiency. Goodbye, liver!

I’ll skip the details about my long illness and resulting surgery, but I have to call out the wonderful doctors and nurses at New York Presbyterian Hospital. They wouldn’t let me die, in spite of the many times I emotionally gave up. I also met a great guy, a Buddhist monk from the Zen Center for Contemplative Care, who helped me keep it all together at the hospital. And of course thanks to you, elderly man in Georgia, for becoming an organ donor.

In December 2009, I set out with my new liver. By that time, I had been in and out of the hospital since October. I spent another three in the hospital and at rehab, thanks to a post-operative stroke. Finally, in February 2010, I was free. My daughter and her husband welcomed me to their home, without a second thought, to recuperate. But I honestly just wanted to die. I weighed 111 pounds (I’m 5’7”), and I had apparently left my muscles at the hospital. I needed a wheelchair to move more than 20 feet. I couldn’t balance properly; I had vertigo just standing up.

After three months of my daughter Stacy’s whole-food cooking (and my Chinese son-in-law’s home-made favorites), I was able to get around with a walker and, on good days, just a cane. I was freezing my ass off up north at Stacy’s home in New Jersey and just wanted to get back home to Florida.

I made it back home in May, still using a walker and a cane. But unfortunately I wasn’t enjoying my “new” life. I’m a widower and I wasn’t able to do the things I most enjoyed to keep myself occupied. I didn’t have the balance to ride a bike, or the visual acuity to drive a car at normal highway speeds. The stroke had thrown something out of whack. Doctors weren’t sure, but suspected a neurological issue has disrupted my vision.

Then Stacy threw out something new to think about. She had been practicing yoga for several years on and off, and thought I should try a class. We went to her local community center for a family yoga class. We left my cane in the car, so as not to alarm the teacher.  I held Stacy’s arm instead, and we made it to the mat.

I managed the mat work without too much of a problem, but could hardly stand – just no balance there. But I enjoyed being able to move again, even in a limited way, and I also enjoyed the camaraderie of the class. Stacy and I went four times, to different studios, during my visit. I had been embarrassed by my physical limitations and because I seemed older than everyone else there, but the teachers I met were so understanding – a nice feeling. Yoga really is for everyone.

Then I saw an ad for a donation yoga class at my county library. I started going weekly and getting stronger. I met a fellow in that class who was 79. Not an exception – just the closest mat. Classes were mixed: about a third younger people, a third maybe 40-55, and a third old farts like me. A woman in that class told me about another class at a church nearby. Two classes in one week – it seemed like a lot at the time, but I was ready to commit to my practice.

Barry Hurchalla camel poseThere I met Dari, my mentor-to-be, who had been practicing yoga for more than 45 years, a vegetarian for more then 35 of them. I thought she was around my age, but it turned out she was 85 incredibly healthy years old. I started to take notice! You can see where this is going. I practiced my yoga, however weak I was, for the next year, twice a week. I continued to grow stronger. Yoga motivated me to improve my diet; I gave up meat and coffee. Once borderline hypertensive, my blood pressure is now well within a normal range, without medication.

It’s now the summer of 2013, and yoga is a huge part of my life. The doctors and nurses at New York Presbyterian saved my life, and yoga makes it worth living. I’m practicing now almost every day at Living Yoga in Vero Beach, Florida, with Elise Mahovlich and her great group of teachers. Yoga may not give me eternal life, but it will let me enjoy the years that I have left. It helps everyone, the once-a-week people and the regulars. I’ve never heard a discouraging word.

When I finally told my teachers about my medical history, they were amazed at how much I can do. And people who know me have told me how much they’ve noticed changes over the past year – even those who knew nothing about my illness. My doctors feel the same way; my primary physician said, “I’ve never prescribed yoga, but it seems like it’s working for you.”

My balance has greatly improved. The cane is long gone. I can even do bakasana – for 10 seconds, but still – and am working on headstand (salamba sirsasana). I’m considering teacher training next year, to help others like myself who need a hand in healing. Maybe you’re also ill, or overweight, or just getting older – just know that yoga is for you. It’s waiting for you.

I might have limited years left in my life, but they’ll be fun ones, thanks to yoga. It was sunny today in Florida. I drove my Can-Am motorcycle to the farmer’s market then went up to the pool for a few hours. I rode my bike. I went to yoga class. Life is good.

Barry motorcycleBarry Hurchalla is a 68-year-old retired auctioneer and antique dealer living on Florida’s East Coast. He moved there a decade ago from a pre-Revolutionary stone home in Pennsylvania, where he made his living selling and auctioning antiques. A dedicated yogi, he also enjoys biking and fishing.

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10 thoughts on “Finding Balance After a Stroke

    • Hi Rex, this is wonderful! As the founder of The Yoga Diaries, I can tell you that I have loads of yoga friends who are your age and older. And many of them can do far more advanced poses than I can!!

      As one possible resource for you, I invite you to check out the Ageless Program, founded by another of our featured writers, Nick Montoya: http://vayuproductions.com/product/the-ageless-program/

      You might enjoy his story as well, here: https://theyogadiaries.net/2013/02/04/ageless/

      You can also find great beginner yoga classes at https://www.yogaglo.com/. I recommend this wonderful teacher for beginning classes. http://www.yogaglo.com/teacher-5-Steven-Espinosa.html He was my first teacher and I can’t recommend him highly enough, especially for beginners!

      I definitely encourage you to venture out and try out some group classes in your community. There is such a wonderful sense of community in the yoga world. Where are you based and I can try to recommend some studios and classes for you.

      Best of luck to you on your journey.

      Cheers,
      Jeannie Page
      Founder, The Yoga Diaries

      • Rex, barry h. here, some of my 1st practice sessions were with a $10 CD by
        Rodney Yee (Yoga for Beginners ) , Target stores ! Still use it at times .

  1. Hi Barry! I went to college with your daughter Stacy and she is awesome! I love your story!! I am a yoga teacher and want to encourage you to become a yoga teacher. The world needs yoga teachers like you that want to work with the mature population and you will truly be an inspiration to them! Namaste

  2. What an incredible story, Barry! I wish you many years of good health and inversions.

    I teach yoga and always tell my students that touching your toes is great at 25 but being able to do so at 80 is the goal 😉

    Just discovered this website and I love it. Keep it up!

  3. Barry, your story is amazing. We at Living Yoga just thought you were a regular yoga student. Only now are we learning about the difficulties you overcame to get to where you are. It must have been difficult to listen to our minor muscle complaints. You are not only our wonderful yoga buddy, you will be our inspiration.

  4. Pingback: Magic Awaits at Every Turn | The Awakened Life

  5. I had a stroke when I was 28 y.o., now I’m 36. I’m a Beginner of yoga on DVD. It’s a start to rebalance my right arm and my legs are doing great.
    Erin

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